Friday, July 8, 2011

Palm Springs Rough Animation

I assembled my complete animation work from the Palm Springs noir short that I directed at MAKE last year. Many shots I took all the way to final cleanup, and the others I blocked in and charted so that my assistant animators could finish them. These are my raw static Photoshop animation sequences, devoid of any post-production whatsoever and set in order to the final audio track. The cars I modelled with NURBS and animated in Maya.


And here is the final piece for a comparison:

4 comments:

  1. It's unbelievably awesome in all creative and technical elements, One piece of animation I especially like is how the Femme Fatale closes the door with her foot. It's amazing how well planned it is to have so little frames read so clearly, move so fluently and have so much attitude

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  2. I love this piece. I may have asked you this before , but can you post some details about how you animated this in Photoshop ? I know that Photoshop has Animation layers, but I can't find good information on using PS Animation layers for traditional-style character animation. Would love to know more about your process on using PS for this project.

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  3. Hello, David! Thanks for your inquiry on my blog, it's an honor to get a comment from you! In the Photoshop Animation timeline, you can set your frame rate / timecode length for your scene. Regular Photoshop layers in the timeline become extendable still frames that can be adjusted for length like in After Effects. You can also choose your Onion Skin settings. In the Photoshop Shortcut keys menu, you can also set key tabs for "flipping" drawings. I use F9 and F10 for "prev frame, next frame", and F7 and F8 for "Preview Start, Preview End" (preview region is like the render preview region in After Effects). This way, you can flip between any two frames on the timeline. Really handy! :) I make my Photoshop scene file size-and-a-half or double-res the final output resolution depending on how large the project is. Palm Springs was 1080p so we animated anywhere from 2K to 4K raster files (for our cleanup, and depending on if there was a multiplane "truck-in" or zoom.) I'm a fan, thanks again for your post. I'm happy to answer any specific questions you have. Best regards!

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  4. Thanks Andrew. I appreciate you sharing those details on your workflow. I have some students who are trying to use Photoshop for paperless animation and I haven't really every used it that way , so the rundown of your workflow is really helpful to me. I usually use TVPaint and that's the app I know best and recommend for paperless animation , but I also understand that a lot of students already own the Adobe Creative Suite so if they can make Photoshop work without having to purchase TVPaint they sometimes prefer that. So this information will help me to point them in the right direction on that . Your Palm Springs Film Festival piece certainly demonstrates that workflow with Photoshop in a great way.

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